Exploding Hoverboard Models Finally Recalled – Find The Hoverboard Recall List Here.

After months of warnings about the safety issues with hoverboards, and not to mention numerous reports of fire and the equipment actually bursting into flames, ten major manufacturers, online retailers, traditional retailers and many distributors have finally given up and have recalled a mammoth 501,000 units so we are bringing you the hoverboard recall list.

The effort has been organized by CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission) after the US government itself declared some models of these flying scooters unsafe for use months ago.

When half a million of anything is recalled, people along with companies get in trouble. So let’s recount the major companies that will see their profits get cut by these recalls. The companies that are on the hoverboard recall list are (you can click on the hoverboard model name to find details about reimbursement):
Note: this website does not sell hoverboards nor is responible for any customer service for any hoverboards.

 

And as far as online retailers go, they are :

Overstock.com has now recalled almost all of the units that the company had sold. That amounts to about 4300 units in totality.

Boscov’s, a relatively small company based in Pennsylvania has recalled 1300 of its Orbit self-balancing scooters/hoverboards.

Leray Hoverboard Self Balancing Electric Scooter Reviews

The simple reason for why these hoverboards on the recall list are being recalled is that, aside from these half a million units, few of these machines actually correspond to new safety regulations.

Very few of these hoverboards have been approved by Underwriters Laboratories and needless to say but that makes hoverboards unsafe for use.

The lithium-ion battery that powers these hoverboard models are prone to overheating and as a result of that it poses a significant threat to the quality of the product and the health of its owner.

The Hoverboard, it has been warned, might actually catch fire and even explode in some cases.

CPSC has also instructed consumers to immediately stop using the device and return the device to the place from where it was bought and ask for a refund, repair or replacement depending on the model and make of the hoverboard.

As mentioned before, the CPSC has suggested the consumers to only buy hoverboards that have been approved by the UL (Underwriters Laboratories) and have also advised consumers to seek a complete refund from their place of purchase if the seller doesn’t have the ones that have been marked as safe.

Even in the case where the seller has the safe ones available, the consumer is expected to get a new replacement without charge.

Swagway is probably the biggest name, on the hoverboard recall list, that has been hit hard by this incident of hoverboard not acquiring safety certification. As a result, CPSC has instructed the concerned personnel to contact Swagway to receive a free repair or some form of credit towards the purchase of the new certified model. The new, and safer, model is named T1 or T3 and has been UL 2272 certified.

The CPSC has communicated similar instructions for those who have bought their hoverboards from companies that have produced hoverboards by the name of Airwalk, Powerboard, Hype Roam, and Hovertrax.

CPSC has also issued the statement that all other hoverboards that haven’t been mentioned in the previous paragraphs must be returned and their manufacturers should be asked for a complete refund.

For those consumers who are not certain about the model/ make of their hoverboard and whether their purchased product qualifies for a “hoverboard recall”, can easily call the consumer hotline at (800) 638-2772.

 

This recall will no-doubt make a huge dent in the confidence levels of the consumer market that had shown concerns about the safety of the product in the past as well.

In hoverboards (and their manufacturers) defense, the fears and doubts about the device had actually started to subside after the initial unfavorable reactions.

The manufacturers had now started to sell UL certified models of the hoverboard to the general public and the hoverboards received their fair share of the media where celebrities and athletes showed off their skills, or lack thereof, on these hoverboards.

Such a massive hoverboard recall count would no doubt refresh the early unsavory memories where a lot of the same hoverboard brands were involved in selling unsafe hoverboards to the public and thus causing horrific accidents.

The CPSC reported that property damages up to $2 million across 20 states have been reported as a result of malfunctioning hoverboards (usually the battery would give out and cause problems in the entire equipment) and in 99 percent of the accidents, there have been injuries reported.

Conclusion

Those who were and still are concerned about the safety of the product will certainly feel vindicated. But the CPSC has warned that they will further investigate the problem of unsafe hoverboards and that might result in even more recalls in the coming months. I hope this hoverboard recall list was helpful.

Here is the complete list of faulty hoverboard manufactures provided by the CPSC.

We have now found the safest Hoverboard model available in 2016, it’s called Powerboard. We’ve reviewed it too. Go here to read about it.

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